Courses for Spring 2023

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
FREN 0100-301 Elementary French I Kathryn Anne Dettmer WILL 306 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0100301
FREN 0100-302 Elementary French I Eleonore Bertrand WILL 215 TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This course is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0100302
FREN 0200-301 Elementary French II Christine M Edelstein WILL 201 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook, as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0200301
FREN 0200-302 Elementary French II Rebecca Harmon WILL 220 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook, as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0200302
FREN 0200-303 Elementary French II CANCELED This course is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook, as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0200303
FREN 0200-304 Elementary French II Eleonore Bertrand WILL 214 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook, as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0200304
FREN 0200-305 Elementary French II Kathryn Anne Dettmer WILL 316 MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook, as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0200305
FREN 0300-301 Intermediate French I Jacqueline Dougherty WILL 202
DRLB 4C2
R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
In French 0300, you will be "parachuted" to Paris where you will choose where you want to live and explore your chosen neighborhood in depth. Every week we will discuss a different theme of Parisian life and French culture. As you discover your arrondissement, you will share information about it with your classmates and develop a collective knowledge of the French capital. You will tell your imagined experiences through your journal and therefore as a class, we will "raconter Paris". French 130 is the first half of the intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak, and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, literary texts, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French language and culture. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0300301
FREN 0300-302 Intermediate French I CANCELED In French 0300, you will be "parachuted" to Paris where you will choose where you want to live and explore your chosen neighborhood in depth. Every week we will discuss a different theme of Parisian life and French culture. As you discover your arrondissement, you will share information about it with your classmates and develop a collective knowledge of the French capital. You will tell your imagined experiences through your journal and therefore as a class, we will "raconter Paris". French 130 is the first half of the intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak, and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, literary texts, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French language and culture. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0300302
FREN 0300-303 Intermediate French I Jacqueline Dougherty DRLB 4C2
WILL 203
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
In French 0300, you will be "parachuted" to Paris where you will choose where you want to live and explore your chosen neighborhood in depth. Every week we will discuss a different theme of Parisian life and French culture. As you discover your arrondissement, you will share information about it with your classmates and develop a collective knowledge of the French capital. You will tell your imagined experiences through your journal and therefore as a class, we will "raconter Paris". French 130 is the first half of the intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak, and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, literary texts, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French language and culture. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0300303
FREN 0300-304 Intermediate French I Rebecca Harmon WILL 216 MWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM In French 0300, you will be "parachuted" to Paris where you will choose where you want to live and explore your chosen neighborhood in depth. Every week we will discuss a different theme of Parisian life and French culture. As you discover your arrondissement, you will share information about it with your classmates and develop a collective knowledge of the French capital. You will tell your imagined experiences through your journal and therefore as a class, we will "raconter Paris". French 130 is the first half of the intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak, and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, literary texts, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French language and culture. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0300304
FREN 0300-305 Intermediate French I CANCELED In French 0300, you will be "parachuted" to Paris where you will choose where you want to live and explore your chosen neighborhood in depth. Every week we will discuss a different theme of Parisian life and French culture. As you discover your arrondissement, you will share information about it with your classmates and develop a collective knowledge of the French capital. You will tell your imagined experiences through your journal and therefore as a class, we will "raconter Paris". French 130 is the first half of the intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak, and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, literary texts, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French language and culture. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0300305
FREN 0340-301 Accelerated Intermediate French CANCELED An intensive two-credit course covering the first and second semester of the intermediate year. See descriptions of French 0300 and 0400. Students must have a departmental permit to register. Also offered in the summer Penn-in-Tours program in France. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Perm Needed From Department</span>
FREN 0400-301 Intermediate French II Rebaia Saouli WILL 301 MTR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400301
FREN 0400-302 Intermediate French II Lisa Ann Britton VANP 113 MTR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400302
FREN 0400-303 Intermediate French II Agnes Arany Trichard WILL 215 MTR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400303
FREN 0400-304 Intermediate French II CANCELED French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400304
FREN 0400-305 Intermediate French II Rebaia Saouli WILL 201 MTR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400305
FREN 0400-306 Intermediate French II Mary Samantha Clarke WILL 6 MTR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM French 0400 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN0400306
FREN 0800-301 Advanced French in Residence Sandrine Faniry Rajaonarivony Open only to residents in La Maison Francaise. Participants earn 1/2 c.u. per semester. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Perm Needed From Department</span>
FREN 1000-301 Advanced French Samuel E Martin WILL 305 MTR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM French 1000 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in this course will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While this course is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region. Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed the language requirement. Students who are continuing from French 0340 or 0400 should take French 1000 before moving on to more advanced French courses. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1000301
FREN 1000-302 Advanced French CANCELED French 1000 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in this course will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While this course is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region. Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed the language requirement. Students who are continuing from French 0340 or 0400 should take French 1000 before moving on to more advanced French courses. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1000302
FREN 1000-303 Advanced French Lisa Ann Britton LRSM 112B MTR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM French 1000 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in this course will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While this course is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region. Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed the language requirement. Students who are continuing from French 0340 or 0400 should take French 1000 before moving on to more advanced French courses. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1000303
FREN 1000-304 Advanced French CANCELED French 1000 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in this course will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While this course is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region. Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed the language requirement. Students who are continuing from French 0340 or 0400 should take French 1000 before moving on to more advanced French courses. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1000304
FREN 1071-401 Fashion and Modernity Jean-Michel Rabate BENN 231 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM In this class we will study the emergence of the Modernist concept of the "new" as a term also understood as "new fashion." We will move back and forth in time so as to analyze today’s changing scene with a view to identify contemporary accounts of the "new" in the context of the fashion industry. Our texts will include poetry, novels, and films. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ARTH2889401, COML1072401, ENGL1071401, GRMN1065401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1071401
FREN 1212-301 Advanced French Grammar and Composition Rebaia Saouli DRLB 2N36 MTR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 1000 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1212301
FREN 1212-302 Advanced French Grammar and Composition Rebaia Saouli CANCELED Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 1000 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1212302
FREN 1214-301 Advanced French Composition and Conversation Chantal Philippon-Daniel WILL 320 MWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1214301
FREN 1214-302 Advanced French Composition and Conversation Chantal Philippon-Daniel WILL 320 MWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France.
FREN 1227-301 French History and Culture 1789-1945 Melanie Peron WILL 321 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This civilization course presents the creation of modern France from 1789 to 1945 through the omnipresence of the mythg of Perseus and Medusa in the historical narrative. The objective of the course is to introduce students to a period in France's history that begins with the French Revolution and ends with Marechal Petain's National Revolution. It also helps them discover the intricacies of the slow constuction of modern France. In this course, students are led to reflect on the contemporary French culture and society that are the result and the remnants of the Revolution, and to make connections with hte American history. This course is taught in French. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
FREN 1227-302 French History and Culture 1789-1945 Melanie Peron WILL 321 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This civilization course presents the creation of modern France from 1789 to 1945 through the omnipresence of the mythg of Perseus and Medusa in the historical narrative. The objective of the course is to introduce students to a period in France's history that begins with the French Revolution and ends with Marechal Petain's National Revolution. It also helps them discover the intricacies of the slow constuction of modern France. In this course, students are led to reflect on the contemporary French culture and society that are the result and the remnants of the Revolution, and to make connections with hte American history. This course is taught in French. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
FREN 1227-303 French History and Culture 1789-1945 CANCELED This civilization course presents the creation of modern France from 1789 to 1945 through the omnipresence of the mythg of Perseus and Medusa in the historical narrative. The objective of the course is to introduce students to a period in France's history that begins with the French Revolution and ends with Marechal Petain's National Revolution. It also helps them discover the intricacies of the slow constuction of modern France. In this course, students are led to reflect on the contemporary French culture and society that are the result and the remnants of the Revolution, and to make connections with hte American history. This course is taught in French. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
FREN 1232-401 Perspectives in French Literature: The Individual and Society Gerald J Prince WILL 438 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Special emphasis is placed on close reading of texts in order to familiarize students with major authors and their characteristics and with methods of interpretation. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 1232 has as its theme the Individual and Society. COML1232401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1232401
FREN 1232-402 Perspectives in French Literature: The Individual and Society Corine Labridy BENN 138 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Special emphasis is placed on close reading of texts in order to familiarize students with major authors and their characteristics and with methods of interpretation. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 1232 has as its theme the Individual and Society. COML1232402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
FREN 1232-403 Perspectives in French Literature: The Individual and Society Gerald J Prince CANCELED This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Special emphasis is placed on close reading of texts in order to familiarize students with major authors and their characteristics and with methods of interpretation. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 1232 has as its theme the Individual and Society. COML1232403 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
FREN 1233-301 Francophone Literature and Film Samuel E Martin WILL 218 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is designed to give students a basic historical and theoretical groundwork in Francophone and postcolonial studies, and to help them develop their skills in literary and filmic analysis. It will provide an introductory survey of the richly diverse literature and film of the French-speaking world, from the 1950s through to the 21st century. Beginning with the gradual breakup of the French colonial empire, we will investigate the construction of individual and collective Francophone identities in such regions as the Caribbean, Africa, and the Maghreb, while exploring an equally wide range of literary and cinematic genres. Other histories and regions such as Quebec and Lebanon will also be discussed. Throughout the course we will remain especially attentive to questions of space--public and private spheres, urban and rural topographies, borders and migrations, as well as the complex dynamics between the Francophone regions and France itself--and to the ways in which these tensions are mapped onto the textual and visual surfaces of the works studied. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN1233301
FREN 2180-301 From West Africa to West Philadelphia: Creating Community in the Francophone Diaspora Elizabeth Collins COHN 204 TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This course explores the immigrant experience with a focus on migration from Francophone West Africa to this country, particularly the impact it has on children and young people. Through a close partnership with young Francophone immigrants at the Lea School, we will focus on the challenges they face adapting to a new cultural and linguistic environment. We will review the Francophone context in order to understand the place of the French language in Africa; look at the immigrant and refugee experience through a variety of texts in French; examine the issues of mono-, bi- and multilingualism both on an individual and a societal basis; look at the competing meanings the French language holds for Black Americans; and study the role of foreign languages in American schools. Students will participate in the weekly Francophone Community Partnership, an after-school program with K - 8 children at the Lea School which seeks to enhance the children’s self-esteem and pride in their linguistic and cultural heritage. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN2180301
FREN 2250-301 Paris during the German Occupation and its Places of [Non-]Memory Melanie Peron COHN 204 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM In this course, we will explore the dark years that characterized the Occupation of France by Nazi Germany and the Collaboration between the two countries supported by the Vichy Regime.A course to explore a past that none of us has directly lived. And not just any past. A repressed, masked, disguised past. A past inhabited by shadows. A past that is whispered. A holed memory. The myth of Marianne Resistance fascinates only for a while before the reality of the camps and the Collaboration looms up with a grimace and provokes fright in us.How to talk about what happened? With what words to recount the story of the disappeared? This was the challenge for the post-Auschwitz society. This is the challenge of this course. Paris will be our anchor point. Capital witness, capital executioner, capital victim. Its streets and walls will whisper to us the stories that were confined between two brackets at the Liberation. It is these stories that we will try to catch on the fly to give them back shape and voice while we bend to the difficult exercise of remembrance. It goes without saying that the objective will not be to judge but to try to understand a past, a past that does not pass ... Assignments include weekly creative writings, translation of survivors' testimonies into English, research in the Archives de Paris and the French press of the time as well as digital mapping and the creation of a digital timeline (no previous skills in digital tools needed). The course is conducted entirely in French. Open to students with a solid advanced level.
FREN 3130-301 French for Business II Sophie E Degat WILL 302 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM The course, conducted entirely in French, emphasizes verbal communication in business professional situations through three components. First, a series of student's presentations, in-class activities (using newspapers' articles, technical readings, radio shows and films), and debates on the following topics (list not exhaustive) related to France's economy and society: The role of the State in France's economy; the French fiscal system; Labor (impact of the 35-hour work week, "conges," women in the workplace, etc.); Regions of France (production); major French industries/companies/brands; France's major imports/exports; "Green business"; Business of pop culture. Second, as effective communication is based not only on linguistic proficiency but also on cultural proficiency, cultural differences mostly between Americans and French will be explored. Finally, throughout the semester, students will work in groups on the creation of their own business, association, or other organization and will be invited to present their project to the class at the end of the semester. On completion of the course, students will also have the opportunity to take the Diplome de Francais Professionnel-DFP Affaires (C1) administered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN3130301
FREN 3250-301 Advanced French Translation Chantal Philippon-Daniel WILL 320 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of translation and is designed to help foster a critical understanding of differences between French and English syntactical and lexical patterns. It will introduce students to theoretical concepts and problems of translation, with the ultimate goal being to improve their ability to communicate in more authentic-sounding French. Students will have the opportunity to practice translation individually and to work with their peers on a variety of projects (advertising, journalistic and literary texts, movie and broadcast news subtitling) and to engage in critique and discussion of others' translations. This course will help students refine their language skills and navigate more proficiently between these cultures and language systems. (Designed for students who already have a solid foundation in French and English grammar) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN3250301
FREN 3290-301 Le français dans le monde/French in the World Christine M Edelstein BENN 20 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Where and how is French spoken in the world? Which variety (or varieties) of French represents "good" or standard language use? What does it mean to have an accent or to experience linguistic insecurity? To what extent have political forces and movements historically affected the evolution of French? How do language attitudes differ among French- and English-speaking regions of the world and what is the status of French in an era of globalization? In what ways does language shape our identities? Le Francais dans le monde/French in the World examines these questions by providing a survey of the sociolinguistics of the French language in the contemporary world. We will explore how societal changes influence the manner and the contexts in which the French language is spoken. Case studies focus on various parts of the Francophone world, including Europe (Belgium, Switzerland), New World (Quebec, Caribbean, Louisiana), Africa (North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa), etc. Readings and class discussions are in French. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN3290301
FREN 3830-401 French & Italian Modern Horror Philippe Charles Met WILL 205 MT 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course will consider the horror genre within the specific context of two national cinemas: France and Italy. For France, the focus will be almost exclusively on the contemporary period which has been witnessing an unprecedented revival in horror. For Italy, there will be a marked emphasis on the 1960s-1970s, i.e. the Golden Age of Gothic horror and the giallo craze initiated by the likes of Mario Bava and Dario Argento. Various subgenres will be examined: supernatural horror, ghost story, slasher, zombie film, body horror, cannibalism, etc. Issues of ethics, gender, sexuality, violence, spectatorship will be examined through a variety of critical lenses (psychoanalysis, socio-historical and cultural context, aesthetics, politics, gender, etc.). CIMS3830401, COML3830401, ITAL3830401
FREN 3850-301 Modern French Theater Gerald J Prince WILL 317 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM A study of major movements and major dramatists from Giraudoux and Sartre to the theater of the absurd and its aftermath. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN3850301
FREN 3860-401 Paris in Film Philippe Charles Met BENN 141 M 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Latter-day examples like Christophe Honore's Dans Paris, Cedric Klapisch's Paris or the international omnibus Paris, je t'aime (with each director paying homage to a distinctive "arrondissement" of the capital), not to mention American blockbusters like The Da Vinci Code and Inception or Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris, are there to remind us that there is something special -- indeed, a special kind of magic -- about Paris in and on film. Despite the extreme polarization between Paris and provincial France in both cultural and socio-economic terms, cultural historians have argued that Paris is a symbol of France (as a centralized nation), more than Rome is of Italy and much more than Madrid is of Spain or Berlin of Germany, for example. The prevalence of the City of Lights on our screens, Gallic and otherwise, should therefore come as no surprise, be it as a mere backdrop or as a character in its own right. But how exactly are the French capital and its variegated people captured on celluloid? Can we find significant differences between French and non-French approaches, or between films shot on location that have the ring of "authenticity" and studio-bound productions using reconstructed sets? Do these representations vary through time and perhaps reflect specific historical periods or zeitgeists? Do they conform to genre-based formulas and perpetuate age-old stereotypes, or do they provide new, original insights while revisiting cinematic conventions? Do some (sub)urban areas and/or segments of the Parisian population (in terms of gender, race, or class, for example) receive special attention or treatment? These are some of the many questions that we will seek to address...with a view to offering the next best thing to catching the next non-stop flight to Paris! For French credit: Please register for both FREN 3860-401 (lecture) and FREN 3860-402 (recitation). The FREN 3860-402 recitation is conducted in French. For Cinema and Media Studies credit: Please register for CIMS 3860-401 (lecture) and CIMS 3860-403 (recitation). Both lecture and recitation are taught in English. CIMS3860401
FREN 5000-001 Proseminar Eva Del Soldato This course will provide a forum for collective preparation for the Master's exam.
FREN 5460-401 Women's Writing in French, 1160–1823 Scott M Francis WILL 516 M 3:30 PM-5:29 PM In this course, we will examine a representative sample of premodern women’s writing in French, beginning in the Middle Ages and concluding in the Revolutionary Era. The authors studied come from differing walks of life, social classes, and religious and political identifications, and they express themselves in a wide variety of genres, including short stories, fairy tales, lyric poetry, letters, plays, and novels. Despite their many differences, these authors are united by a common tendency to question a centuries-old tradition of misogynistic discourse, patriarchal social order, and gender normativity. Authors to be studied include: - Marie de France (ca. 1160), a brilliant storyteller and poet attached to the court of Henry II of England whose fabulous tales, arguably an early form of speculative fiction, imagine alternatives to the rigidity of arranged marriages and the heterosexual couple. - Christine de Pizan (1364–ca. 1430), a court writer for Charles VI of France and several other powerful patrons who is often considered France’s first professional female writer. Her Livre de la Cité des Dames (Book of the City of Ladies) systematically refutes the misogynistic pronouncements of learned male authors and holds up devotion and religious life as alternatives to accepting the assigned role of wife and mother. - Marguerite de Navarre (1492–1549), the sister of Francis I of France and a prolific author of devotional poetry, plays, and the Heptaméron, a collection of tales modeled on Boccaccio’s Decameron and known for its often shocking subject matter. Throughout her oeuvre, she calls into question the social perception of women rooted in misogynistic discourse, as well as the tendency to blame sexual violence on women, while at the same time revealing the potential danger of masculinity for men and women alike and envisioning Pauline Christianity as a means of radical equality. - Pernette du Guillet (1520–1545), Louise Labé (c. 1524–1566), and Anne de Marquets (1533–1588), three poets who respond to and write against the male-centered tradition of Petrarchan love poetry. Guillet and Labé stand out for their frank and often sensual depictions of female desire and sexuality in spite of taboos against their public expression, while Marquets, a Dominican nun at the convent of Poissy, combines Petrarchan, devotional, and mystic tropes to envision religious life as an alternative to the heteronormativity of lay French society and the Protestant Reformation. - Madame de Lafayette (1634–1693) and Madame de Sévigné (1626–1696), whose writings are of monumental importance in the history of literature in French as well as invaluable testimonies to the role played by women in the intellectual developments of the early modern period, including salons, Jansenism, and free-thinking (libertinism). - Gabrielle-Suzanne de Villeneuve (1685–1755), author of the first known version of La belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast), who, along with other female authors of fairy tales, used the conventions of the genre to challenge social conventions and criticize the treatment of women. - Claire de Duras (1777–1828), whose novel Ourika, much like Villeneuve’s La belle et la bête, shows how feminist concerns might intersect with colonialism and race; a bestseller in its day, it is one of the first works in French to feature a complex and articulate black narrator and what many scholars consider to be a modern outlook on race and identity. To provide historical and theoretical context, these readings will be supplemented with relevant primary and secondary sources, as well as with modern and contemporary adaptations, such as illustrations and films. The course is open to graduate students and to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor. Discussions will be in English. Readings will be made available both in the original French and in English translation, and final papers may be writte COML5460001, GSWS5460001 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=FREN5460401
FREN 5710-401 Literature and Multilingualism Inge Arteel WILL 301 M 3:30 PM-5:29 PM Since several years, the societal and cultural reality of multilingualism has become an important research field in linguistics and literary studies, as in cultural studies more generally. This graduate course will investigate how multilingual poetics challenge and resist paradigms and ideologies of innate monolingualism, linguistic mastery, absolute translatability and monocultural nationalism. To begin with, the course will introduce central aspects of scholarship on literature and multilingualism, covering concepts such as heteroglossia, code switching, translingualism and macaronic language, and debates such as those on world literature, global English, foreignization, (un)translatability and non-translation, including their political and ethical importance. After a brief historical overview, glancing at western literary multilingualism in the Middle Ages, Romanticism and the avantgarde, the course will mainly focus on literature of the late 20th and 21st centuries taken from Germanic and Romance linguistic contexts. Using an exemplary selection, the course will cover prose, poetry and drama, and include excerpts of texts by authors such as Andrea Camilleri, Gino Chiellino, Fikry El Azzouzi, Ernst Jandl, Jackie Kay, Çağlar Köseoğlu, Monique Mojica, Melinda Nadj Abonji, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Olivier Rolin, Yoko Tawada, Nicoline van Harskamp, and others. Reading these texts, we will try to determine how multilingualism manifests itself (linguistically, discursively, rhetorically, thematically, contextually etc.) and how the texts engage with linguistic, cultural and social pluralities. The course will conclude with a focus on the translator as a central character in fictional prose and movies. Classes will take place in an interactive format that stimulates discussion and exchange. Students will get the respective excerpts – both in the original version and in English translation – one week at a time so that they can prepare themselves each week for the discussion. Theoretical and contextual information will be provided via Power Point presentations. COML5710401, DTCH5710401, GRMN5710401, ITAL5710401
FREN 6910-401 Transatlantic Black Feminisms in Francophone Literatures Corine Labridy WILL 516 R 1:45 PM-3:44 PM This course explores the evolution of representations of the Black femme body in French and francophone imaginaries, tracing a chronological arc that begins with early colonial imagery and ends with the rise of a 2018 movement spearheaded by a collective of Black comediennes, denouncing exclusionary practices in the French entertainment industry. We will first focus on the male gaze — European, Caribbean and African — and the way it constructed the Black femme body, to better understand how Black female authors undermine, resist, parody, or continue to bear the weight of these early images when they take control of their own representation. While our primary readings will be authored by French-writing women, including Mayotte Capecia (Martinique), Marie Vieux-Chauvet (Haiti), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Mariama Bâ (Senegal) and Marie Ndiaye (France), our theoretical foundation will include anglophone thinkers, such as bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Saidiya Hartman, and others. Readings and discussions will be in English. AFRC6910001, COML6910001, GSWS6910001